World Aids Day



World Aids Day is observed on 1 December every year, is dedicated to raising awareness of the AIDS pandemic caused by the spread of HIV infection, and mourning those who have died of the disease. Government and health officials, non-governmental organizations and individuals around the world observe the day, often with education on AIDS prevention and control.

As of 2013, AIDS has killed more than 36 million people worldwide (1981-2012), and an estimated 35.3 million people are living with HIV, making it one of the most important global public health issues in recorded history. Despite recent improved access to antiretroviral treatment in many regions of the world, the AIDS epidemic claims an estimated 2 million lives each year, of which about 270,000 are children.

World AIDS Day 2014 is an opportunity to harness the power of social change to put people first and close the gap. Ending the AIDS epidemic by 2030 is possible, but only by closing the gap between people who have access to HIV prevention, treatment, care and support services and people who are being left behind. 

Closing the gap means empowering and enabling all people, everywhere, to access the services they need.

  • By closing the HIV testing gap, the 19 million people who are unaware of their HIV-positive status can begin to get support. 
  •  By closing the treatment gap, all 35 million people living with HIV will have access to life-saving medicine.
  • By closing the gap in access to medicines for children, all children living with HIV will be able to access treatment, not just the 24% who have access today.
  • By closing the access gap, all people can be included as part of the solution. 

Closing the gap means that ending the AIDS epidemic by 2030 is possible.